Bradley Donnelly

 

 

Full name:         

Bradley Donnelly

Study/Department Area:

Engineering

Profile Type:

PhD Candidate

Qualifications:

Bachelor of Engineering (Robotics) / Master of Engineering (Electronics)

History

 

I am currently a PhD student at the Centre for Maritime Engineering, Control and Imaging (CMECI) at Flinders University.  I am currently investigating the acoustic properties of new antifouling techniques. I completed my bachelor and master of engineering at Flinders University and during that time I was involved in several undergrad robotics competitions, this piqued my interest in instrumentation and signal processing. I was also involved in a Defence science and technology organisation (DSTO) research internship, this got me interested in research. When I graduated I was interested in doing research however the field it was in was not a deciding factor so I willing to “pivot” slightly into a different field of engineering.

 

 

Research Project/s summary/description

Fouling is the accumulation of unwanted substances, such as proteins molecules or organisms on structures, pylons boats or pipes due to exposure to their environment. As these foulants accumulate they can have many adverse effects on the structures they are fouling. They can reduce the max speed of a ship; weaken supports on oil rigs; reduce functionality of many sensors and increase fuel consumption which leads to further environmental issues.

Traditionally various toxic biocides, such as Tributyl-tin (TBT), were used to effectively combat the fouling process. However, TBT has been facing increasing regulations since the 1980’s until it was completely banned by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) in 2008. As regulations on many biocides become stricter, the need for an effective low/non-toxic environmentally friendly antifouling measure grows.

Currently most of the research in this area is focused on bio-mimicry, which aims to understand or replicate a solution already present in nature to develop or refine new solutions. Many of the new technologies significantly alter the surface chemistry of substratum at the water interface.

The application of these new technologies to acoustics sensors could significantly alter their acoustic properties and it is for this reason that further investigation into this needs to be done. It is important to characterise the acoustic properties of the new antifouling techniques (those that significantly affect the surface chemistry and those that don’t) as well as commercially available antifouling paints. This needs to be done at various stages of the fouling process with and without antifouling measures.

PhD Thesis Title

Novel Anitfouling for Acoustic Sensors

Research Supervisors:

Dr Youhong Tang, Assoc Professor Karl Sammut, Adj Assoc Prof Steven Schmied and Mr Ian Bedwell

Research Interests:

Acoustics, Signal Processing, Materials, A.I. and Natural Language Generation

Teaching Interests / Subjects:

Digital Electronics and Control Systems

Full name:         

Bradley Donnelly

Study/Department Area:

Engineering

Profile Type:

PhD Candidate

Qualifications:

Bachelor of Engineering (Robotics) / Master of Engineering (Electronics)

History

 

I am currently a PhD student at the Centre for Maritime Engineering, Control and Imaging (CMECI) at Flinders University.  I am currently investigating the acoustic properties of new antifouling techniques. I completed my bachelor and master of engineering at Flinders University and during that time I was involved in several undergrad robotics competitions, this piqued my interest in instrumentation and signal processing. I was also involved in a Defence science and technology organisation (DSTO) research internship, this got me interested in research. When I graduated I was interested in doing research however the field it was in was not a deciding factor so I willing to “pivot” slightly into a different field of engineering.

 

 

Research Project/s summary/description

Fouling is the accumulation of unwanted substances, such as proteins molecules or organisms on structures, pylons boats or pipes due to exposure to their environment. As these foulants accumulate they can have many adverse effects on the structures they are fouling. They can reduce the max speed of a ship; weaken supports on oil rigs; reduce functionality of many sensors and increase fuel consumption which leads to further environmental issues.

Traditionally various toxic biocides, such as Tributyl-tin (TBT), were used to effectively combat the fouling process. However, TBT has been facing increasing regulations since the 1980’s until it was completely banned by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) in 2008. As regulations on many biocides become stricter, the need for an effective low/non-toxic environmentally friendly antifouling measure grows.

Currently most of the research in this area is focused on bio-mimicry, which aims to understand or replicate a solution already present in nature to develop or refine new solutions. Many of the new technologies significantly alter the surface chemistry of substratum at the water interface.

The application of these new technologies to acoustics sensors could significantly alter their acoustic properties and it is for this reason that further investigation into this needs to be done. It is important to characterise the acoustic properties of the new antifouling techniques (those that significantly affect the surface chemistry and those that don’t) as well as commercially available antifouling paints. This needs to be done at various stages of the fouling process with and without antifouling measures.

PhD Thesis Title

Novel Anitfouling for Acoustic Sensors

Research Supervisors:

Dr Youhong Tang, Assoc Professor Karl Sammut, Adj Assoc Prof Steven Schmied and Mr Ian Bedwell

Research Interests:

Acoustics, Signal Processing, Materials, A.I. and Natural Language Generation

Teaching Interests / Subjects:

Digital Electronics and Control Systems